Abstract ID: 3575

Primary Topic: Curriculum design and development
Secondary Topic: Teaching, learning, and assessment

Do One, Teach One, See One: Flipping the medical learning paradigm from passive to active
Melinda Ring, MD, FACP; Rupa Mahadevan, MD; Elaine Cheung, PhD; Sreela Namboodiri, MD, , Chicago, IL, United States

Late Breaker: No

Overview

This session is intended for faculty or trainees involved in any form of education in the field of integrative health. Active learning strategies can increase students’ motivation, improve their participation, confidence and interpersonal skills, and encourage them to be involved in higher order thinking. Engaging students through active learning techniques such as changing lectures to pre-work videos, in class role playing, case discussion, coaching, and project-oriented hands on learning can help engage all students by making them an integral part of the learning process. During this workshop participants will learn strategies for incorporating active learning to support their learning objectives, practice several forms of active learning with colleagues, and formulate a plan for incoproration of at least one new active learning strategy into their own work. By the conclusion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  •         Remember and understand key concepts and terms related to active learning.
  •         Be comfortable enough to implement at least one active learning strategy in his or her teaching.
  •         Evaluate the suitability of an active learning exercise for a given course situation.
  •         Be able to relate active learning to other teaching methods.
  •         Understand some of the personal and social implications of using active learning in his or her classroom.
  •         Care about learning more about active learning.
  •         Have a list of resources for learning more about active learning

Rationale

This workshop addresses integrative medicine education teaching methods and curriculum development, as well as the process of collaboration with colleagues both within and outside of the medical field to enrich curriculum development. Medical schools struggle with finding time for required coursework within student’s schedules, and integrative medicine and lifestyle focused topics are often given inadequate time in the core curriculum, or relegated to electives or clubs. When presented as a required curriculum, a subset of the learners may come with preconceived biases against integrative and complementary medicine, or feel the content is not valuable and worth attention compared to more conventional training such as anatomy and pharmacology. Engaging students through active learning techniques such as role playing, case discussion, coaching, and hands on learning can help engage all students by making them an integral part of the learning process. Active learning can also be used in smaller groups when offered outside of usual class time, when students may need a more engrossing experience to maintain their interest levels. While shifting from traditional lectures to active learning can require additional work by faculty during the preparation phase, it can lead to a greater enjoyment of teaching by fostering greater interactions with students. Ultimately, inviting students to participate in the learning environment gives them greater responsibility and allows students to see a course as more valuable and directly related to their goals, thereby creating a more fulfilling experience for faculty and students alike.

Objectives

This session is intended for faculty or trainees involved in any form of education in the field of integrative health. Active learning strategies can increase students’ motivation, improve their participation, confidence and interpersonal skills, and encourage them to be involved in higher order thinking. During this workshop participants will learn strategies for incorporating active learning to support their learning objectives, and practice several forms of active learning with colleagues. By the conclusion of this workshop participants will be able to:

·         Remember and understand key concepts and terms related to active learning.

·         Be comfortable enough to implement at least one active learning strategy in his or her teaching.

·         Evaluate the suitability of an active learning exercise for a given course situation.

·         Be able to relate active learning to other teaching methods.

·         Understand some of the personal and social implications of using active learning in his or her classroom.

·         Care about learning more about active learning.

·         Have a list of resources for learning more about active learning

Methods/Session Format

As an introduction to active learning methods, this workshop will teach through example.

(15 minutes) Workshop participants will learn about several key strategies to implement small group and large group active learning methods in their own classrooms and course work. Faculty will first provide a brief history of the evolution of our Culinary Medicine elective for medical trainees, and how subsequent iterations aimed to minimize passive learning lectures based on student feedback and faculty observations.

(60 minutes)  These activities in active teaching and learning will range from 5 to 15 minutes each.

(15 minutes) Participants will co-create a list of examples of active learning, and brainstorm the benefits of shifting away from passive teaching methods. Participants will develop ideas of specific learning activities for their own institutions and work together to consider possible barriers and solutions.

Outline

Active learning is a process whereby students engage in activities that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content. Active learning stands in contrast to standard modes of instruction in which teachers do most of the talking and students are passive. Cooperative learning, problem-based learning, and the use of case methods and simulations are some approaches that promote active learning.

In this session we’ll review several approaches to active learning, using as a case example their incorporation within a Culinary Medicine elective at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, developed by faculty from the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine in partnership with the nonprofit organization Common Threads.

1.       Flipped classroom- creating short video segments for pre-homework rather than classroom passive lectures

2.       Case-based improvisational patient coaching exercises

3.       Student-led discussion of an assigned article

4.       Active hands-on learning (culinary session) and mindful meal together

5.       Learning through teaching (medical students volunteer in a Chicago Public School to teach children about nutrition)

6.       Social media- the use of Facebook or Google Classroom as a forum for active exchange of ideas between classes

Materials to be Distributed

Participants will leave with a list of resources for learning more about active learning