Abstract ID: 3690

Primary Topic: Whole systems and acupuncture (including TCM and Ayurveda)
Secondary Topic: State of the science/evidence base for integrative modalities

Changes of prescription rates of antimicrobials in respiratory departments between western medicine hospitals and integrative/traditional Chinese medicine hospitals under the stewardship
Na Huang, Master, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China; Xiaoying Yang, Master, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China; Di Wang, Master; Ruixue Hu, Master, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China; Lingzi Wen, Master, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China; Yajing Zhang, master; Xinlin Li, master, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China; Baoyong Lai, Master, Center for evidence-based Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China; Nanqi Zhao, Master; Sainan Fang, Master, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China; Yu-tong Fei, MD, PhD, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China

Late Breaker: No

Purpose

Our study aims to explore the changes of prescription rates of antimicrobials in respiratory departments between western medicine (WM) hospitals and integrative/traditional Chinese medicine (IM-TCM) hospitals.

Methods/Session Format

We searched five major databases to identify literatures reporting antimicrobial prescription analysis data of respiratory departments in health care organizations in China. All included studies were classified by geographic region (east, middle, west and northeast), level (primary, secondary and tertiary) and type (WM/IM-TCM) of health care organizations. We pooled data using single rate meta-analysis.

Results

258 reports were included. 238 reports were from WM hospitals, 20 from IM-TCM hospitals. Data covered 24 provinces and 3 municipalities in China. In east China, antimicrobial prescription rates of IM-TCM hospitals dropped greatly during and after the stewardship, from 90% (2 studies, 238 patients, I2=73%), 63% (3 studies, 1208 patients, I2=94%, random) to 39% (2 studies, 1160 patients, I2=95%) comparing to those of the WM hospitals, from 89% (51 studies, 15296patients, I2=98%), 77% (22 studies, 8723 patients, I2=98%) to 76% (8 studies, 5751 patients, I2=97%). In tertiary hospitals, the antimicrobial prescription rates in IM-TCM hospitals responded to the stewardship better, from 93% (5 studies, 631 patients, I2=82%), 81% (5 studies, 1578 patients, I2=97%) to 31% (1 studies,1100 patients, I2=94%), comparing to WM hospitals, from 90% (91 studies, 28407 patients, I2=95%), 89% (26 studies, 14775 patients, I2=98%) to 79% (10 studies, 7559 patients, I2=95%). Data of IM-TCM hospitals from other parts of China and other level of hospitals was insufficient to analyze.

Conclusions

Respiratory departments in east China and in tertiary hospitals (both IM-TCM hospitals and WM hospitals) responded to the policy effectively. Use of TCM might reduce the non-compulsory use of antimicrobials for patients. More data for use of antimicrobials for out-patients, from secondary, primary and private practices, and from IM-TCM health care organizations is needed.