Abstract ID: 3764

Primary Topic: Mind-body (including meditation and yoga)
Secondary Topic: Health Services Research/Cost Effectiveness
Tertiary Topic: State of the science/evidence base for integrative modalities

Mindfulness is associated with sleep quality among patients with fibromyalgia
Michelle Park, BA, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States; Yuan Zhang, PhD, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA, United States; Lori L Price, MAS, MLA, Tufts University, Boston, MA, United States; Xingyi Han, MPH; Raveendhara R Bannuru, MD, PhD; Chenchen Wang, MD, MSc, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States

Late Breaker: No

Purpose

Patients with fibromyalgia commonly experience sleep disturbance. Previous studies suggest higher mindfulness may be associated with better sleep quality in people with chronic pain conditions. However, the role of mindfulness in fibromyalgia remains understudied. We examine the relationships between mindfulness and sleep disturbance, depression, and pain interference in fibromyalgia.   

Methods/Session Format

We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a randomized controlled trial in fibromyalgia patients. We measured mindfulness (Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, scale direction reversed for this analysis), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), sleep disturbance (PROMIS Sleep Disturbance), chronic pain (PROMIS Pain Interference with daily activities), and depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II). Pearson’s correlations were used to examine associations between mindfulness, sleep quality, sleep disturbance, depression, and pain interference. Mediation analysis was conducted to assess whether pain interference mediates the relationship between mindfulness and sleep.

Results

176 patents with fibromyalgia were included (93% female, mean age: 52±12 years, BMI: 30±7 kg/m2, 60% white). Higher mindfulness in patients was associated with better sleep quality (r = 0.22, p = 0.003) as well as less sleep disturbance (r = 0.23, p = 0.002), chronic pain (r = 0.31, p < 0.0001), and depression (r = 0.59, p < 0.0001) (Table). Chronic pain mediated the associations between mindfulness and sleep quality (42.7% of total effect, p = 0.05) and mindfulness and sleep disturbance (33.8% of total effect, p = 0.03) (Figure).

Table. Correlations between Mindfulness, Sleep, Depression, and Pain (n = 176)

Variables

Mean FFMQ

PSQI

PROMIS-SD

PROMIS-PI

Mean FFMQ*

1

   

PSQI

0.22**

1

  

PROMIS Sleep Disturbance

0.23**

0.71**

1

 

PROMIS Pain Interference

0.31**

0.38**

0.38**

1

BDI-II

0.59**

0.40**

0.31**

0.61**

Note: **p < 0.01. FFMQ (Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, range 39-195), *higher scores = lower mindfulness, original scale direction inverted for this analysis; PSQI (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, range 0-21), higher scores = worse sleep quality; PROMIS-SD (PROMIS Sleep Disturbance t-score, range 28.9-76.5), higher scores = more sleep disturbance; PROMIS-PI (PROMIS-Pain Interference t-score, range 41-78.3), higher scores = worse pain interference; BDI -II (Beck Depression Inventory 2nd Edition, range 0-63), higher scores = worse depressive symptoms.

Conclusions

Higher mindfulness is associated with better sleep quality in people with fibromyalgia, with chronic pain mediating this relationship. Longitudinal studies designed to increase mindfulness in patients with fibromyalgia are warranted.